We store cookies, you can get more info from our privacy policy.
3DS

Iwata Asks: Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D

by Matthew Blundon - June 28, 2011, 9:36 am PDT
Total comments: 6 Source: Nintendo UK, http://www.nintendo.co.uk/NOE/en_GB/news/iwata/iwa...

Iwata sits down and talks to the producer of Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D.

Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D is due out in European territories this Friday, and to bring attention to Capcom's first Resident Evil game for the Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo has released an Iwata Asks feature geared towards the title. The interview this time around is with the producer of the Resident Evil series, Masachika Kawata.

Throughout the feature, many interesting tidbits of information are revealed. For instance, when Iwata quizzed Kawata on whether or not making two Resident Evil games for the Nintendo 3DS was their plan from the beginning, he responded by saying:

The plan for Resident Evil: Revelations was moving along first, but we were putting a lot of work into the scenario and other aspects of the game, so it was going to take a long time to complete. However, we wanted to release something soon after the Nintendo 3DS system hit the market, so we started making and testing Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D - the game system of which was already pretty much in place. I thought Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D stood above Resident Evil: Revelations when it came to impact rather than fear, and there was a desire to see it become its own product, so it worked out perfectly.

Later into the interview, the two went on to discuss the appeal of both handhelds and the Wii in Japan. Kawata remarked that his parents seldom played video games, but thanks to the Wii, were turned into gamers. In addition to this, Kawata also remarked that he enjoyed nintendogs + cats due to the realism that the 3D effect had on the game.

Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D is due out in North America today and later in the week for European territories.

Talkback

MorariJune 28, 2011

Some interesting tidbits of information were not revealed however. Capcom seems to think that they can counter the used games market by instituting a system of limited saves.

DRM of any kind consistently boggles my mind. Instead of charging less for games or increasing the perceived value through features or service, game companies would rather hurt paying customer and actually decrease the value of their product. Are publishers and developers really just that stupid? They're doing exactly the opposite of what should be done to counter missed sales.

Ian SaneJune 28, 2011

DRM's problem usually is that those that want to pirate games always find a way to do it.  So the paying customers are the only ones that are actually affected.  Having virtually no DRM would be just as effective because those that want to pirate do so anyway.  The only thing they need to block is the really easy methods of piracy that any regular Joe can do, like how it was so easy to copy floppy discs back in the day.  You don't want it to be incredibly easy to do but you don't need to come up with all sorts of convoluted stuff to stop the average person.

I think there is a scale between it being so easy to pirate that everyone does it and having so much convoluted BS that people look into piracy to get around it.  You want to be in the middle.  You don't leave your store unattended but it isn't like the only other option is to pat down every person leaving the store.

MorariJune 28, 2011

I can rip and copy any CD that I own. Anyone can with the greatest of ease. It's a feature built directly into most operating systems nowadays. Music DRM (when it even exists) is a joke. I don't see it destroying the music industry though. If anything, the golden age of P2P music forced the record labels to adapt to some extent. Now they're making more money then ever as they charge people relatively cheap prices for single song downloads.

Video games have two primary problems going against them. The first is value. Most games do not offer up enough incentive to justify their absurdly high prices. The second is convenience. DRM is the very antithesis of convenience. It even further devalues the game. These two factors only harm paying customers though. Pirates don't have to worry about value nor fumbling with DRM. When you hurt paying customers, you loose customers. Instead of fighting pirates, who will generally never become customers for one reason or another, companies should instead be looking to increase the value of their product as much as possible to draw in truly potential customers. A good start would be to scrap all DRM and pass the savings in R&D onto the consumer.

The VCR didn't kill Hollywood, but your rights are still being stripped away with junk like Blu-Ray. Consumer rights are never even a flashing thought for media companies. They want control. They want planned obsolescence. They want more money than they deserve. The joke is on the customer though, because abstaining from buying the product (ie: voting with your wallet) will probably just be blamed on piracy anyway. It's a pretty absurd circle that only a bunch of out of touch, white-collar executives could come up with.

CericJune 29, 2011

Quote from: Morari

I can rip and copy any CD that I own. Anyone can with the greatest of ease. It's a feature built directly into most operating systems nowadays. Music DRM (when it even exists) is a joke. I don't see it destroying the music industry though. If anything, the golden age of P2P music forced the record labels to adapt to some extent. Now they're making more money then ever as they charge people relatively cheap prices for single song downloads.

Video games have two primary problems going against them. The first is value. Most games do not offer up enough incentive to justify their absurdly high prices. The second is convenience. DRM is the very antithesis of convenience. It even further devalues the game. These two factors only harm paying customers though. Pirates don't have to worry about value nor fumbling with DRM. When you hurt paying customers, you loose customers. Instead of fighting pirates, who will generally never become customers for one reason or another, companies should instead be looking to increase the value of their product as much as possible to draw in truly potential customers. A good start would be to scrap all DRM and pass the savings in R&D onto the consumer.

The VCR didn't kill Hollywood, but your rights are still being stripped away with junk like Blu-Ray. Consumer rights are never even a flashing thought for media companies. They want control. They want planned obsolescence. They want more money than they deserve. The joke is on the customer though, because abstaining from buying the product (ie: voting with your wallet) will probably just be blamed on piracy anyway. It's a pretty absurd circle that only a bunch of out of touch, white-collar executives could come up with.

So Wall Street and Congress.

Quote from: Morari

DRM is the very antithesis of convenience.

Not necessarily. Steam is both DRM and incredibly convenient.

CericJune 29, 2011

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

Quote from: Morari

DRM is the very antithesis of convenience.

Not necessarily. Steam is both DRM and incredibly convenient.

Not to mention fairly priced for the most part and I have never had any problem with transferring my games onto several machines, unlike iTunes...(stupid app store)

Got a news tip? Send it in!
Advertisement
Advertisement